Limbic System

From WikiLectures

(Redirected from The limbic system)

The limbic system

The limbic system is a group of structures localised in the forebrain and the hypothalamus. It is named after the Latin term limbus which means border; this is because the limbic system exists as the border of the cortex.

The limbic system is responsible for all emotions humans exhibit, instincts, drives and also is responsible for learning skills and memory.

Components of the Limbic System[✎ edit | edit source]

Limbic structures

The limbic system consists of:

  1. amygdala: this connects the olfactory bulb and the cortex to the rest of limbic system. It is responsible for fear and other fight or flight emotions
  2. septum: this part connects the olfactory bulb and the cortex to the rest of the limbic system
  3. hippocampus: it is involved in the Papez loop where impulses from the hypothalamus travel to the anterior thalamus and then from the cingulate gyrus through the hippocampus back to the hypothalamus. It is responsible for special navigation and recalling of the short term and long term memory.
  4. cingulate gyrus: connects limbic system and cerebral cortex
  5. hypothalamus: connects vision and auditory senses to limbic system. It is responsible for linking nervous system with the endocrine system.
  6. anterior thalamus: connects limbic system and cerebral cortex; responsible for learning and memory.


Links[✎ edit | edit source]

Bibliography[✎ edit | edit source]

  • KAPIT, W. The Physiology Coloring Book. 2nd edition. 1999. ISBN 0-321-03663-8.
  • FITZGERALD, M.J. Turlough. Clinical neuroanatomy and neuroscience. 6th edition. 2012. ISBN 978-0-7020-3738-2.